nothing is lost: coming home again after Brigit Rest

photo credit: Sadie

photo credit: Sadie

When you go on a weekend retreat, waking up Sunday morning everyone has one foot out the door already. Packing papers, books, pens and notes away. Stripping the sheets off the bed. Taking home any leftover chocolate or half-open bottles of wine that didn’t quite get finished.

Pausing a minute, I turned the knob on the prompt-and-fortune teller for one last word.

Nothing is lost. Not the car keys. Not even paradise.

The next day, Monday, fellow participant Lisa Vihos wrote a brief essay about our time together and published it over at the Best American Poetry blog, titling it “To Heaven and Back Again.”

So there’s a theme here.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Poetry Speaks

2016 marks MMoCA’s 115th anniversary and 10th year in its Cesar Pelli-designed facility, which opened in April 2006. To observe the occasion, the museum will plan a series of events and programs to be held on April 8, 9, and 10.

For the weekend-long celebration, MMoCA invited poets from across Wisconsin to submit works that animate, celebrate, and deliberate on the value of the arts to a community. Sarah Sadie Busse and Wendy Vardaman, proprietors of Cowfeather Press and Madison’s fourth Poets Laureate, chose poems for presentation.

The poems will screen throughout the weekend on a large-scale video monitor in the museum’s lobby; a selection will be professionally audio-recorded for broadcasting in the museum and out onto State Street. A printed portfolio of all submitted poems will be available for review.

 

Poetry Speaks: An Open Call continues MMoCA’s long-standing commitment to highlighting the connections between visual art and poetry.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

I Didn’t Know There Were Latinos in Wisconsin: Three Decades of Hispanic Writing (third edition)

edited by Oscar Mireles

Above: Authors from I Didn’t Know There Were Latinos in Wisconsin at the Madison book launch. Front row: Nydia Rojas, Leana Nakielski, Oscar Mireles (editor), Nayla Chehade, Margarita Dumit. Back row: Dominic Ledesma Perzichilli, Angela Trudell Vasquez, Tomy C. Tepepa-Carmona, Moisés Villavicencio Barras, Sara Alvarado, Rubén Medina

softcover, literature
Cover Art: Ben Seydewitz
ISBN 978-0-9846568-5-1
LCCN 2014947554

mirelesTwenty-five years ago Oscar Mireles published the anthology, I Didn’t Know There Were Latinos in Wisconsin: 20 Hispanic Poets. This third volume in the series includes the work of more than thirty authors of poetry, essay, memoir, and fiction and demonstrates once again the breadth and depth of Latino/a writing and literature in Wisconsin. Not strangers, not new arrivals, these authors represent an important part of the region’s cultural and social fabric. Written sometimes in English, sometimes in Spanish, and sometimes in a dynamic mixture of both languages, Mireles’ anthology helps to extend many narratives: not only of what it means to be Latino/a in the Midwest, but also what it means to be Midwestern.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Echolocations, Poets Map Madison

echolocationsedited by Sarah Sadie Busse, Wendy Vardaman & Shoshauna Shy

ISBN 978-0-9846568-4-4, softcover, poetry
November 2013
also available as a Kindle book
Group Discussions: Download pdf of questions and promts

Proceeds benefit the Madison Poet Laureate Fund. Read more about the Madison Poet Laureate programa volunteer position overseen by the Madison Arts Commission.

Here’s a literary block party filled with both echoes and locations, as more than 100 poets share poems that refer to specific Madison places. Long-time residents live next door to writers who passed through for only a while. Local streets intersect with myth, history, personal narrative and ecology. More than geography, more than chronology, what emerges is something akin to the shifting psyche of a city. Poem by poem, a new map evolves, folds back upon its own stories, and rewrites itself over and over through its sounds and its silences, taking into account a variety of perspectives, a multitude of voices. In the end these poets ask us, How many Madisons are there?

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone