Nación Nómada / Nomadic Nation by Rubén Medina

softcover, literature, $15
Cover Art: Inda Sáenz, “Zócalo de Oaxaca,” 2015. Óleo sobre tela, 50 x 39.5 cm.
ISBN 978-0-9846568-7-5
LCCN 2015944838

medinaThis expanded edition of Rubén Medina’s 2010 Nomadic Nation / Nación Nómada includes a new introduction by the author about his poetics as well as new translations of work originally written in Spanish. Composed in English, Spanish and Spanglish, these important poems reflect on the lives of immigrants/ emigrants, our restless spirits, and the human journey: “We are at the periphery of the center / and at the center of the periphery / at the same time.”

Writes Medina in “Una poetica norteada”: “There is no purity in language. There never has been. … Interference can at times simply end up increasing the vocabulary of a dominant language, or provoke changes in structure and meaning, but quite often it also reveals a double voice or double consciousness. Spanglish marks the on-going tensions between assimilation and difference for the migrant subjects. It points also to the cycle of nation formation once again or to nation de-formation. … I called my poetics, una poética norteada, alien, nomadic. This term, norteada/o, describes a person who is lost while pursuing a destination. To be lost is of great artistic, political and existential value, since that lost person seeks a way out knowing in the process that getting on the right road is not necessarily a destination.”

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Sister Satellite by Cathryn Cofell

softcover, poetry
available as a Kindle book
Cover Art: David Graham, Eternal Flame
ISBN 978-0-9846568-3-7
LCCN 2013933909

cofellIn Sister Satellite Cathryn Cofell writes with power and a hard-earned, wide-ranging scope. As poet Oliver de la Paz writes, “the language of Cofell’s debut collection shimmers in amplitudes of love.” Love, yes, but hers is an engaged love that won’t let us go easily. Her poems provide an answer to the politics and pressures of our times, as Cofell wrests the microphone for herself, turns up the volume and the heat and writes about women’s lives and bodies in lines which are funny, bold, defiant, angry and celebratory. Married love and unvoiced lust, pregnancy, miscarriage, adoption, abortion and aging all figure into the mix.

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Luz de Todos los Tiempos / Light of All Times

88 pages, softcover, poetry
also available as a Kindle book
Cover Art: Heteo Pérez Rojas, Alas y Hojas/ Wings and Leaves.
ISBN 978-0-9846568-2-0
LCCN 2013933908

Read an Interview with Moisés Villavicencio Barras

villavicenciobarrasIn this bi-lingual collection of poems, Luz de Todos los Tiempos / Light of All Times, Mexican poet Moisés Villavicencio Barras explores the idea of crossing from a multitude of perspectives, and comes again and again from his various journeys, back to the central figures of his parents. This is a book of love and homage, as well as a tender but honest exploration of what it means to grow into adulthood and reconcile oneself with the past.

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Unexpected Shiny Things by Bruce Dethlefsen

104 pp, softcover, poetry
ISBN 978-0-9846568-0-6 (paper)
Cover Art: Diwas Sherchan

dethlefsenAvailable as an e-book for Kindle & Nook.
Visit Dethlefsen’s Amazon author page.

Reading Unexpected Shiny Things with a group? Classrooms, reading groups, & community reads may want to start with discussion questions written by the author and editors of Cowfeather Press.

Read an Interview with Bruce Dethlefsen by Sarah Busse.

In his second, full-length collection, poems of innocence and experience take readers from the schoolyard to the trout stream, from birth to death. Dethlefsen’s familiar, folksy voice acquires new depth and darkness.

As Max Garland notes, “there’s clarity that’s not to be confused with naiveté or simplicity.” Dethlefsen chooses to speak in a plain voice that makes room for the lyrical in these poems, using a common vocabulary and an understated tone of voice. While his previous collections have hinted at darker tints to life, this book allows the darkness its due, paying attention to death, to loss, to grief, and to anger. The people in this book, including the poet/speaker, are conflicted and multi-dimensional: failing, trying again, and, in the meantime, loving as best they can.

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